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  • Seniors learn about affects, benefits of medical cannabis Seniors explore various forms of cannabisApproximately a dozen seniors attended a presentation by Mitcho Thompson from Peace In Medicine on July 19, on the affects and benefits of medical ...
    Posted Jul 31, 2017, 4:36 PM by Wayne Wieseler
  • LGBTQI seniors face extraordinary challenges Older population is growingAmerica's older population is growing, and so is the number of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, questioning, and intersex(LGBTQI) adults who are moving into their ...
    Posted Jul 31, 2017, 4:30 PM by Wayne Wieseler
  • Age Friendly Sonoma County seeks local data Sonoma County has joined the Global Network of Age Friendly Communities! An age friendly community features safe, walkable streets; housing and transportation options; services tailored to older people, and community ...
    Posted Jul 26, 2017, 9:14 AM by Wayne Wieseler
  • Year of the Senior to celebrate economic, social contributions Celebrating Seniors 2017 has been designated The Year of the Senior to further celebrate the economic and social contributions of those age 60 and older in our community. This initiative ...
    Posted Jul 21, 2017, 1:02 PM by Wayne Wieseler
  • YOUNG, GAY, AND ILLEGAL - Then & Now Published on July 5, 2017 It has been 50 Years since homosexuality was decriminalized, and times have changed. Hear the discussion of an openly gay 13-year-old Louis and ...
    Posted Jul 12, 2017, 3:49 PM by Wayne Wieseler
  • Mid-Morning Murmurations: Natural History Outing for Seniors Friday, July 21, 10 a.m. - NoonLaguna Environmental Center, 900 Sanford Road, Santa Rosa, CA 95401 Join us mid-morning for a special visit to the lovely Laguna Environmental ...
    Posted Jul 12, 2017, 9:15 AM by Wayne Wieseler
  • Senior Center to help earn income, make planned gift We are pleased to announce that we now can arrange for you to purchase a Charitable Gift Annuity!Charitable Gift Annuities A charitable gift annuity is a great way to ...
    Posted Jun 28, 2017, 4:09 PM by Wayne Wieseler
  • Senior Center recruits fall prevention program facilitator. Job Description Fall Prevention Program FacilitatorContract Period: July 1, 2017 – January 31, 2018Reimbursement: $2,800Duties: To facilitate a Fall Prevention Advisory Committee to identify and initiate a ...
    Posted Jun 21, 2017, 2:33 PM by Wayne Wieseler
  • Mobilizing for a Culture of Nonviolence The Call for a Culture of Nonviolence In the face of the Trump Administration’s priorities — demonizing immigrants, dismantling social programs, destroying environmental safeguards, diminishing civil rights, and dramatically increasing ...
    Posted Jun 29, 2017, 10:12 AM by Wayne Wieseler
  • Volunteer Job Opportunities Following are volunteer opportunities at the Sebastopol Area Senior Center. To apply, please contact: Linda Civitello, MA, CFRE, Executive Director linda@sebastopolseniorcenter.org 167 N. High St. Sebastopol, CA 95472 ...
    Posted Jul 5, 2017, 10:07 AM by Wayne Wieseler
  • I’m Home Alone Telephone Outreach Program Many seniors are living alone. Every single day of the year, Catholic Charities volunteers place friendly, personal check-in calls to those who are disabled or otherwise housebound. Often our ...
    Posted Jun 7, 2017, 2:32 PM by Wayne Wieseler
  • Attitudes towards aging often blind us Year of the SeniorAttitudes towards aging often blind us to the fact that millions of seniors are active, experienced, capable, and talented.They want to continue to remain engaged ...
    Posted Jun 2, 2017, 10:28 AM by Wayne Wieseler
  • LGBTQI Elder Information and Assistance Program launches Sonoma County, CA – The second year of local programs to support lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) seniors has started, including the launch of the LGBTQI Elder Information & Assistance Program ...
    Posted Apr 24, 2017, 3:07 PM by Wayne Wieseler
  • Dine with seniors and guests Monday through Friday, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.Dine with seniors and guests at Sebastopol Senior Center Fresh meals, made daily, to order. Visit with local seniors and ...
    Posted Dec 29, 2016, 10:41 AM by Wayne Wieseler
Showing posts 1 - 14 of 14. View more »

Seniors learn about affects, benefits of medical cannabis

posted Jul 31, 2017, 4:36 PM by Wayne Wieseler   [ updated Jul 31, 2017, 4:36 PM ]

Seniors explore various forms of cannabis

Approximately a dozen seniors attended a presentation by Mitcho Thompson from Peace In Medicine on July 19, on the affects and benefits of medical cannabis. There was a display of the various forms of cannabis and he covered everything from the effects to how to get your doctor’s letter of recommendation.

The following essay is a distillation of author Laurel Dewey’s book “Betty’s (Little Basement) Garden.”

By Laurel Dewey

During the nearly two years I spent researching my book, “Betty’s (Little Basement) Garden,” I met a lot of seniors who were intrigued with the idea of using marijuana to either replace their prescription medications or eliminate them completely. The problem was that most of these people had either never used marijuana or had bought hook, line and sinker into the fervent propaganda campaigns against the herb. Many of the seniors I interviewed told me they’d be open to using the herb if they knew it was effective and safe. Based on my conversations with them, I compiled a list of the most common questions and concerns they had. In addition, some of the seniors shared their observations and reactions with me when they used marijuana for the first time.

Marijuana is SAFER than prescription medications.

This might be hard to believe if you’ve been trained to believe the propaganda campaigns but it’s absolutely true. According to the CDC, in 2008, 36,450 deaths were attributed to prescription drug overdose. How many people have died from using marijuana? NONE. Ever. If you look at the stats, acetaminophen is more dangerous than marijuana, leading to the death of over 450 people annually. And the “side effects” of marijuana are minor in comparison to the side effects of many prescription drugs. You will NEVER see a warning such as, “This drug may increase the likelihood of suicide or suicidal thoughts,” connected to marijuana. Sadly, the same cannot be said for other medications.

Marijuana is not addictive.

Ask any responsible individual who uses marijuana and they will tell you that the herb is not physically addictive. People can use marijuana daily and then stop it “cold turkey” and their body will not revolt with shakes, tremors or sweat-soaked withdrawal. Ask that same marijuana user and he/she will happily tell you that marijuana is “habitual” and “a pleasant respite” from pain, anxiety and stress. Looking forward to feeling that relief is more akin to looking forward to reconnecting with an old friend than the anxiousness that surrounds “getting your next fix.” As one woman told me, “I’m addicted to getting a good night’s sleep. Marijuana helps make that possible because it forces my mind to stop racing and I can finally relax.”

Marijuana can increase the uptake of certain pharmaceutical drugs, allowing one to reduce the daily dose of their medication.

Research shows that certain cannabinoids—especially the psychoactive cannabinoid THC—within the marijuana plant can and do increase the delivery of various classes of drugs. For example, marijuana naturally lowers blood pressure and often regulates it over time. Thus, if you are taking blood pressure medicine while also using marijuana, you need to be watchful and keep an eye on your blood pressure. Opiates are typically enhanced when marijuana is used concurrently. The bottom line is that marijuana has the potential for accentuating the effect(s) of many popular drugs because it has the capability of also replacing those drugs for some users. That brings us to #4…

Marijuana can and does replace multiple OTC and prescription medications.

One of the obvious complaints seniors have regarding their daily medications is that the first pill often causes side effects that the second one is supposed to fix. But that rarely happens and more drugs are typically prescribed until the patient doesn’t know whether their medicine is doing them more harm than good. Marijuana is a multiple dimensional healing plants that targets varied conditions such as inflamed joints, high blood pressure, chronic pain, digestive disorders, constipation, headaches, insomnia, anxiety, cognitive awareness and more. Thus, this herb could easily replace close to one hundred percent of what’s in senior’s medicine cabinet right now.

Marijuana does not cause brain damage or lower IQ.

“I don’t want to use anything that’ll make me dingier than I already am!” I heard this comment a lot from seniors. Some were genuinely convinced that if they took one puff of a marijuana cigarette, their mental capacity would sharply diminish and remain that way. While neophytes may need to learn how to “train their brains” when they use marijuana, there is absolutely no documentation that shows the herb reduces or “kills brain cells.” In fact, the opposite is possibly true. Studies with Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s patients indicate that the herb gradually encourages new neural pathway development in the brain and could be a neuron protector, allowing those with impaired brain function to potentially halt further degeneration and even elicit enhanced cerebral function. Furthermore, marijuana actually encourages creative problem solving, with some users reporting being able to “figure out solutions to problems I’ve been struggling with for a long time.”


There are specific marijuana strains that have been bred to remove “the high.”

A certain percentage of the seniors I talked to were adamant when they told me, “If I could get the medical benefit from the plant without the high, I’d consider it.” That’s absolutely possible now, thanks to a cannabinoid called CBD (Cannabidiol). Plant breeders are working overtime to develop “high CBD strains” that either has no THC (the psychoactive cannabinoid in marijuana) or have a small percentage of it. CBD is great for inflammation, eases the pain, stimulates bone growth, suppresses muscular spasms, reduces anxiety and increases mental focus.

You do NOT have to smoke marijuana to gain the benefits from it.

Understandably, a lot of seniors either can’t smoke due to health issues or choose not to smoke. And thanks to the “stoner persona,” they believe that the only other way to take the herb is via the ubiquitous “pot” brownie. The fact is that marijuana can be added to just about any regular recipe in the form of cannabis infused butters or oils. For example, you can replace your salad dressing oil with “canna-oil” (marijuana infused olive oil) and discreetly ingest it at mealtime. There are also liquid extracts, syrups, lozenges, candies, chocolates, etc. to choose from. Liquid extracts allow users to “titrate” or regulate their dose. In other words, one can literally take the extract drop by drop every ten minutes or so until they reach the point of physical or mental relief they’re after. For those who miss smoking and like inhaling marijuana, vaporizing is alternative to smoking. Vaporizing allows the user to inhale the heat sensitive essential oils while smoking the herb tends to burn those up.

Marijuana-infused products can be used topically for effective relief from cuts, burns and inflammatory pain.

Most people can’t believe the topical powers of this ancient herb until they see it in action for themselves. One woman suffered a moderate burn on her finger that was quite painful. Her niece applied a small amount of a concentrated marijuana salve and bandaged it. The woman reported that her finger stopped hurting almost immediately and within three days new skin had grown over the burn. A simple marijuana-infused salve can diminish arthritic joint pain and works quite well for low back discomfort. And there is NO cerebral psycho-activity from topical use of marijuana-infused products.

Marijuana use will not necessarily make you fat.

A lot of seniors may not know much about marijuana but they have heard about “the munchies” that the herb is purported to encourage. Yes, it’s true that this plant can stimulate the appetite but the distinction should be made that appetite “enhancement” is also likely. What this means is that if a senior is not interested in food, if they use marijuana and then take a bite of food, the taste and texture of that bite is often improved and the desire to experience that same taste sensation again is increased. The concern about “getting fat” when you use marijuana is not a fait accompli. If you need to put on extra weight, marijuana can help make that happen. But there are also those who use marijuana daily in their food and report either losing extra pounds or stabilizing at a weight that better suits them.

There are thousands of marijuana strains and they are good for different things.

One strain does not fit all. There are strains that are specific for anxiety and strains that are targeted for insomnia. You wouldn’t want to take a strain that is meant for deep and restful sleep when you needed to interact and function with friends and family. Likewise, ingesting a strain that is meant for social interaction and creative problem solving when you really just want to get some sleep would not be your best choice. Most of the seniors I talked to didn’t know the difference between an Indica strain and a Sativa strain. And Indica is more sedating to the body and mind while a Sativa is much more elevating and energizing. Even when one finds a marijuana strain that consistently works for them, it can be advantageous for seniors to try different strains because tolerance to the same strain has been known to build up.

Marijuana can be fun.

One thing I noticed with the seniors I talked to is that many of them feel like life has no excitement left. Then, after using marijuana, many of them gushed to me about they “haven’t laughed that hard in years,” or how they noticed something about their surroundings that they’d never seen before. “Life,” as one woman expressed it, “was enhanced.” Colors were more vivid, music was crisper, her morning coffee tasted better and overall, she felt “reacquainted” with the world around her. Others told me that they enjoyed better social interaction and were able to “forget” or “leave behind” their doldrums and grief and “breathe in life again.” For those seniors who have become stuck in their ways, marijuana can afford them the opportunity to be more creative and even experiment with ideas and concepts that are outside their scope of comfort.

What I took away from all these wonderful people was the realization that marijuana has the potential to improve seniors’ lives on multiple levels. For those who enjoyed it, it was their ally for physical maladies and a friend to them when sadness, anxiety or depression lurked closer. For those who were intrigued by it but were also nervous about what they’d been told, education—free from propaganda—was the key to unlocking their courage and giving a little plant the chance to change their life.

~ Laurel Dewey is the best selling author of the Jane Perry thriller series as well as the standalone novel, “Betty’s (Little Basement) Garden,” the first fiction novel featuring medical marijuana in Colorado. Laurel lives with her husband and two orange cats in rural Western Colorado.

 

LGBTQI seniors face extraordinary challenges

posted Jul 31, 2017, 4:29 PM by Wayne Wieseler   [ updated Jul 31, 2017, 4:30 PM ]


Older population is growing

America's older population is growing, and so is the number of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, questioning, and intersex(LGBTQI) adults who are moving into their later years. In the next several decades, LGBTQI adults age 65 and above is expected to double, reaching more than 3 million by 2030, according to Michael Adams, executive director of SAGE, the nation's largest and oldest organization working to improve life for LGBTQI older adults.

LGBTQI Elder Resource Program

To that end, Sonoma County Human Services Department Adult and Aging Division contracted with Sebastopol Area Senior Center to provide a countywide LGBTQI-specific information and assistance service that will encourage LGBTQI seniors to feel comfortable in identifying their needs and accessing services. We created a resource web page (www.sebastopolseniorcenter.org/lgbtqi-elder-resource-center) with local, regional, and national support services as well as an online information and assistance request form. LGBTQI elders are also welcome to call 707-829-2440 for live one-on-one support.

Preparing for diversity in aging populations

These are the five main challenges we need to address if we want our society to be prepared for the full diversity of its aging population:

Basic Health Care

In the United States, about 80 percent of long-term care for older people is provided by family members, such as spouses, children, and other relatives. But LGBTQI elders are only half as likely as their heterosexual counterparts to have close family to lean on for help. This means that they rely heavily on the services of professional health care providers — doctors, pharmacists, or hospital and nursing home staff — who might be uncomfortable with or even hostile toward LGBT elders and who are not trained to work with them. In SAGE's experience, even when these providers are supportive, fear of discrimination prevents many LGBT older people from seeking out the care they need.

Caregiving Issues

Can you imagine not being able to care for a longtime partner or spouse, or have any say in your loved one's medical care? It’s unthinkable for most of us. Because the support systems of LGBTQI elders — their partners and their families of choice — often are not recognized under the law, LGBTQI people frequently are not granted family or medical leave to take care of a sick or terminally ill partner. Furthermore, LGBTQI people can be excluded from decision-making on a partner's medical care and funeral plans, unless they have put specific legal arrangements in place. Unfortunately, many people don't make such arrangements, either because they can't afford the legal costs or because they, like so many Americans, think they can put them off for another day.


Financial Insecurity

LGBT older people are less financially secure than American elders as a whole. For example, poverty rates among elder lesbian and gay couples are 9.1 percent and 4.9 percent, respectively, compared with 4.6 percent among elder heterosexual couples. Several factors contribute to higher poverty rates, including employment discrimination and barriers in Social Security, Medicaid, and pension and retirement plans that deny same-sex couples key retirement benefits afforded to the broader population. In addition, state laws can shut LGBTQI partners out of an inheritance, or can require them to pay steep taxes on an estate that a surviving heterosexual spouse would inherit tax-free.

Social Isolation

Despite creating families of choice and other support networks, many LGBTQI older people still experience high rates of social isolation. They are twice as likely to be single and to live alone, and three to four times as likely to be childless. They are also less likely to feel welcome in the places where many older people socialize, such as senior centers, volunteer centers and places of worship.

Access to Aging Services

LGBT older people often do not access aging services out of fear of harassment or hostility. Few aging services providers plan for, or reach out to, the LGBTQI community — and few are prepared to address insensitivity or discrimination aimed at LGBTQI elders by staff or other older people.

Fortunately, such attitudes are changing. A recent survey of aging services providers shows that a growing number of respondents would welcome LGBTQI elders, but lack the proper training. Resources such as the federally funded National Resource Center on LGBT Aging (lgbtagingcenter.org/) have been created to provide training and tools to aging providers, LGBTQI organizations and LGBTQI older people themselves, ensuring that our community increasingly will be able to age with the dignity and respect we all deserve.

The source for much of the factual information in this news release is from a blog written by Michael Adams who executive director of SAGE, the nation's largest and oldest organization working to improve life for LGBT older adults.

Age Friendly Sonoma County seeks local data

posted Jul 26, 2017, 9:13 AM by Wayne Wieseler   [ updated Jul 26, 2017, 9:14 AM ]

Sonoma County has joined the Global Network of Age Friendly Communities! An age friendly community features safe, walkable streets; housing and transportation options; services tailored to older people, and community engagement—all of which make a community livable. If you are 50 years old or better, click on the link below to complete our survey and help us identify what makes your community a great place to grow up and a great place to grow old! Your answers, together with other research by Council on Aging and the County of Sonoma, will help form an action plan that guides Sonoma County toward becoming age friendly and livable for all. The survey should take about 20 minutes to complete and will close August 18.

Take the Age-friendly Sonoma County Survey

For more information: contact the Age Friendly Community Coordinator at rtolliver@councilonaging.com

Year of the Senior to celebrate economic, social contributions

posted Jul 21, 2017, 1:00 PM by Wayne Wieseler   [ updated Jul 21, 2017, 1:02 PM ]

Celebrating Seniors

2017 has been designated The Year of the Senior to further celebrate the economic and social contributions of those age 60 and older in our community. This initiative aspires to support and encourage senior entrepreneurialism, as well as promoting Sonoma County’s image as a tourist destination for seniors.
► Explore

YOUNG, GAY, AND ILLEGAL - Then & Now

posted Jul 12, 2017, 3:49 PM by Wayne Wieseler   [ updated Jul 12, 2017, 3:49 PM ]

Published on July 5, 2017

It has been 50 Years since homosexuality was decriminalized, and times have changed. Hear the discussion of an openly gay 13-year-old Louis and an openly gay 78-year-old Percy to have a chat about the differences 50 years have made on gay culture and acceptance.

YOUNG, GAY AND ILLEGAL - Then & Now

Mid-Morning Murmurations: Natural History Outing for Seniors

posted Jul 12, 2017, 9:04 AM by Wayne Wieseler   [ updated Jul 12, 2017, 9:15 AM ]

Friday, July 21, 10 a.m. - Noon
Laguna Environmental Center, 900 Sanford Road, Santa Rosa, CA 95401


Join us mid-morning for a special visit to the lovely Laguna Environmental Center. Over hot drinks and light snacks and surrounded by Stacey Schuett’s beautiful art exhibit “FAUNA,” we’ll enjoy a brief overview presentation about the Laguna de Santa Rosa, a wetland of International Importance and learn about the Laguna Foundation’s restoration, conservation science, and education work in the watershed.

Then we’ll take a leisurely stroll around the Center’s native plant landscape, observing the active bird-life and learning about the fascinating history of historic Stone Farm. Wheelchair accessible, this outing will be partly indoors and partly outdoors, covering less than 1⁄4 mile on compacted dirt paths with plenty of benches along the way. The views are beautiful, the peacefulness of the setting is soothing, and the sights and sounds are a delight to the senses. Treat yourself to this fun, interesting, and inspiring outing right here in your own backyard.

For more information, visit www.lagunafoundation.org Or contact Anita Smith, Public Education Manager, Laguna de Santa Rosa Foundation (707) 527-9277 x 110, anita@lagunafoundation.org

$15 (non-refundable). Pre-registration required: www.lagunafoundation.org


The Laguna de Santa Rosa Foundation works to restore and conserve the Laguna de Santa Rosa, and to inspire public appreciation for this Sonoma County Wetland of International Importance.

Senior Center to help earn income, make planned gift

posted Jun 28, 2017, 4:06 PM by Wayne Wieseler   [ updated Jun 28, 2017, 4:09 PM ]

We are pleased to announce that we now can arrange for you to purchase a Charitable Gift Annuity!

Charitable Gift Annuities

A charitable gift annuity is a great way to make a gift and create an income stream for you or a loved one. In exchange for your charitable gift, you or your loved one will receive a fixed annuity for life, part of which may be tax-free. Additionally, you will receive a charitable tax deduction and a potential reduction in gift and estate taxes. The size of the payment is determined at the time the gift is made and will not fluctuate with the financial markets.

Your gift to establish a charitable gift annuity also assures that the Sebastopol Area Senior Center continues to be the home-away-from-home that we are for so many elderly in our community.

Sebastopol Area Senior Center has partnered with the Silicon Valley Community Foundation (SVCF) to issue charitable gift annuities. With assets of approximately $8 billion under management, SVCF provides the expertise and financial resources required to back Sebastopol Area Senior Center charitable gift annuities.

Why are gift annuities so appealing?

  • You will become a member of the Sebastopol Area Senior Center President’s Council
  • Your annuity income payments are fixed and are not affected by market turbulence.
  • Your payments are secure, backed by all of the Foundations unencumbered assets.
  • You may qualify for a tax-deductible donation.
  • There may be a potential to increase your cash flow, especially if the annuity is funded with low-yielding assets.
  • A portion of the payments you receive may be tax-free.
  • Donors might receive a capital gains tax advantage if the annuity is funded with long-term appreciated assets.
  • The security of fixed payments can be directed to you or to a loved one, such as a parent, sibling or child.
  • Best of all, the residuum will be used for the long-term benefit of the Sebastopol Area Senior Center!

Senior Center recruits fall prevention program facilitator.

posted Jun 20, 2017, 2:12 PM by Wayne Wieseler   [ updated Jun 21, 2017, 2:33 PM ]

Job Description

Fall Prevention Program Facilitator

Contract Period: July 1, 2017 – January 31, 2018

Reimbursement: $2,800

Duties: To facilitate a Fall Prevention Advisory Committee to identify and initiate a comprehensive fall prevention intervention in Sebastopol.
  • Identify and recruit members to the committee including representative orthopedic or geriatric specialists, emergency responders, health care providers, and seniors.
  • Conduct meetings to review available fall prevention curriculum, determine optimal program for Sebastopol; determine if additional components are needed to supplement priority curriculum
  • Identify prospective venues for program referrals
  • Arrange for implementation of program at SASC with Program Coordinator and Julie Smith
  • Appraise Executive Director of opportunities for continued program funding (grants)

Once the committee is formed, they will determine with the facilitator how often they should meet to achieve objectives. A minimum of a monthly meeting is required for the committee and additional facilitator time for recruiting, researching existing programs, meeting preparation, and reporting is expected.

Qualifications:
  • BA in health education, gerontology, and or equivalent experience with elder health interventions
  • Strong organizational skills
  • Ability to facilitate meetings
  • Ability to implement program planning and outcomes reporting
  • Basic understanding of community data profiles, program impact evaluation
  • Proficient in Microsoft Office
Opportunities:
This project is funded by a seed grant. Funding sources will be solicited for continuation and expansion of the project.

To apply please contact:
Linda Civitello, MA, CFRE, Executive Director
Linda@sebastopolseniorcenter.org
167 N. High St.
Sebastopol, CA 95472
707.829.2440
www.sebastopolseniorcenter.org

Mobilizing for a Culture of Nonviolence

posted Jun 13, 2017, 4:06 PM by Wayne Wieseler   [ updated Jun 29, 2017, 10:12 AM ]

The Call for a Culture of Nonviolence

In the face of the Trump Administration’s priorities — demonizing immigrants, dismantling social programs, destroying environmental safeguards, diminishing civil rights, and dramatically increasing the prospect of war — we call on you, and your loved ones, and your friends — and all people everywhere — to be part of an unprecedented movement-of-movements for a culture of nonviolence free from war, poverty, racism and environmental catastrophe.

The time has come for powerful nonviolent resistance to challenge the calamity we face at this critical moment and to set our society on a new course.

The time has come for all of us to pool our nonviolent power to resist the tragedy we face and to signal, once and for all, our determination to build a world of peace, racial justice, economic equality, and a healthy planet for all.

We call on you — and all people everywhere — to join us in training for nonviolent action, in creating a community for nonviolent action, and in taking nonviolent action in this challenging time.

The power of this movement will not be rooted in fear or hatred. It will be grounded in our love for the earth and all its inhabitant. It will be nourished by courage and compassion. And it will be fostered by a great way of nonviolence, which Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. called “the love that does justice.”

The Call for Nonviolent Action in September 2018

With this resolve, we invite people everywhere to join our powerful eighteen-month journey from now until the 2018 Campaign Nonviolence Week of Actions—September 15-23—when thousands of nonviolent actions will take place across the United States shortly before the pivotal US Congressional elections.

This is not an electoral strategy—it is larger than that. Together we will take dramatic, nonviolent action in cities and towns across the US and around the world to frame the mid-term elections as a Referendum for a Nonviolent Future. We will march and rally not to support specific candidates but to sharpen the choice before the nation and the world: Will we ratify the policies of violence and injustice—or will we set a new course for nonviolence, justice and peace?

The centerpiece of the September 2018 Action Week will be the Campaign Nonviolence Convergence in Washington, DC, a multi-day set of nonviolent actions in the nation’s capital dramatically magnifying the national and international mobilization of thousands of actions that week for a nonviolent future.

The Call to Build Momentum Toward September 2018

Between now and the 2018 mid-term elections, we will be part of this historic effort to build a powerful people- power movement for nonviolent change. To contribute to this growing momentum, Campaign Nonviolence calls on people everywhere to take the following concrete steps together.



Together we will take action during the upcoming 2017 Campaign Nonviolence Week of Actions, September 18-24. Since 2014, Campaign Nonviolence has organized an annual action week in September, where marches and rallies calling for a culture of peace and nonviolence have taken place in all 50 states and a growing number of countries. This past September, tens of thousands of people took to the streets in 758 Campaign Nonviolence marches, vigils, rallies and other forms of public witness calling for a nonviolent culture. Our goal this fall is 1,000 nonviolent actions.

Together we will take nonviolent action training. Using role-plays, small group discussions, and informative presentations, nonviolence training prepare participants for action, provide principles and methods and help build community. Most of all, attendees go deeply into the power and dynamics of active nonviolence. Nonviolence training is critical to the success of a nonviolent action. Look for training on the Nonviolence Hub co-sponsored by Campaign Nonviolence and Pace e Bene.

Together we will form affinity groups. It is hard to make change by ourselves. We, therefore, invite people everywhere to form Campaign Nonviolence Affinity Groups. Affinity groups—usually consisting of between 5 and 10 people—are small action communities whose members support one another in taking action, studying nonviolence, reflecting on the realities of our time, and envisioning the way forward. Affinity groups have been an important part of effective movements—and are needed now more than ever.

Together we will explore launching a Nonviolent City. Imagine Nonviolent Seattle or Nonviolent Boston or Nonviolent Tokyo. Campaign Nonviolence calls on activists, organizers, local leaders, political and religious leaders and ordinary citizens in every city in the nation and beyond to organize their local community as a Nonviolent City. So far, 35 cities across the US are exploring this. Imagine your city as a culture of nonviolence — and the concrete, long-term steps it will take to get there.

Together we call on people to organize local and regional gatherings and conferences in Spring 2018. Campaign Nonviolence envisions local and regional assemblies across the US and beyond in Spring 2018. We urge CNV friends around the nation to organize day-long gatherings, conferences, and retreats to plan for their local fall convergence and to deepen this movement for a culture of nonviolence. Campaign Nonviolence staff are happy to assist in making these gatherings a reality.

Together we will take action nationally and internationally in September 2018 before the Congressional elections. In addition to the thousands of actions we are planning throughout the US and around the world during the 2018 Campaign Nonviolence Week of Actions, the Campaign Nonviolence Convergence in Washington, DC will be a multi-day call for a nonviolent shift. We are envisioning a day of nonviolence training; a day of lobbying on Capitol Hill; a day of nonviolent direct action; and a silent march from the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial to the White House. Together— in Washington, across the country, and around the world—we will call on the nation to see the impending mid-term Congressional elections as a decisive Referendum for a Nonviolent Future.


The Call to Build a Historic Movement

What will it take to build a culture of nonviolence? A society where everyone counts? The world where there is peace for all, racial justice for all, economic equality for all, a healthy planet for all, and nonviolent solutions for all?

These kinds of questions have prompted women and men throughout history to grapple powerfully with towering injustice and to make concrete change possible. Each step forward in the age-old task of definitive liberation for all has been ultimately rooted in such a vision—and, at the same time, has helped to make that vision more clear and real.

Such a direction is needed now more than ever. We are in new territory, and things will likely get worse before they get better. That is why we need each other at this decisive time—to take action together, train together, build community together, envision nonviolent cities together, and mobilize together.

As challenging as things are, we know that nonviolent strategies for social change are twice as effective as violent ones, as the quantitative analysis of Erica Chenoweth and Maria Stephan documented in their groundbreaking book, Why Civil Resistance Works. There is something else that their research established: movements which activate 3.5% of the population are likely to succeed. In the United States this is a tall order — 12 million people — but we envision working with many campaigns and movements over the next eighteen months to help build such an unprecedented movement-of-movements seeking to connect the dots between issues, to achieve concrete goals of justice and peace, and to lay the foundation for building a culture of peace and nonviolence.

Let Us Now Begin

Nonviolence combines an unmistakable rejection of violence with the power of love and truth for justice, peace, and care for the earth. It is a powerful means of struggle and resistance, creativity and compassion, and healing and forgiveness. It is a way of life and a method for effective change.

As Pope Francis recently declared, “A culture of nonviolence is not an unattainable dream, but a path that has produced decisive results. The consistent practice of nonviolence has broken barriers, bound wounds, healed nations."

Similarly, Campaign Nonviolence believes that a culture of nonviolence is not only possible but critically necessary—so we are taking to the streets and mobilizing for a new way of nonviolence, a new future of nonviolence, and a new world of nonviolence.

We call on you – and all who read this declaration— to join this movement, to build Campaign Nonviolence wherever you are, and to mobilize the nation for this long-term work of creating this new culture of nonviolence.

Please send this call to all your friends and colleagues, to all your groups and religious communities, to students, activists, and people across the nation. Post this call on social media, and help spread it far and wide.

At this critical turning point, let us take powerful nonviolent action together to resist the enormous challenge of violence and injustice we face in this perilous moment and to boldly shine the light of nonviolence in our lives, our communities, our societies and our world.

~ Pace e Bene Nonviolence Serice and Campaign Nonviolence

Volunteer Job Opportunities

posted Jun 13, 2017, 9:09 AM by Wayne Wieseler   [ updated Jul 5, 2017, 10:07 AM ]

Following are volunteer opportunities at the Sebastopol Area Senior Center. To apply, please contact:

Linda Civitello, MA, CFRE, Executive Director
linda@sebastopolseniorcenter.org
167 N. High St.
Sebastopol, CA 95472
707.829.2440
www.sebastopolseniorcenter.org

Gratitude Assistant/Administrative Assistant

Time required: 4 - 8 hours per week

Day/Time
Flexible, but regular schedule preferred, (such as being present the same days/time each week).

Duties
Prepare thank you letters or notes for all donations received each week. All letters will be signed by the Executive Director and then the volunteer asked to prepare the letters for mailing and postage.

Requirements

  • Use of Excel, word processing and mail merge essential.
  • Excellent grammar skills.
  • Comfort in learning copying machine, postage meter, and e-filing system.
  • Ability to use email.
Reports To: Executive Director

Training
A review of the procedures, how to use the postage machine, etc. will be provided.

Commitment

If you are comfortable with the task, we ask that you make a minimum commitment of three months. If you like working with seniors, we have a homey location and fun people to work with. 

Reception Assistants: 4 Positions Needed

Time required: 4 - 6 hours per week

Day/Time
Flexible, but regular schedule preferred, (such as being present the same days/time each week).

Duties
The front desk reception is critical to conveying hospitality to our guests. The volunteer will be asked to welcome visitors, answer the phone and route inquiries to the appropriate staff. Once familiar with the organization, the volunteer will be trained on protocols for checking in seniors who participate in programs, classes, lunch and other services.

General administrative and clerical support is needed, including but not limited to:

  • Answer telephone, screen, and direct calls
  • Respond to queries from the public and customers
  • Greet persons entering center
  • Tidy and maintain the reception area
  • Other duties as assigned
Reports To: Executive Director

Requirements

  • A friendly, welcoming attitude.
  • Understanding senior needs and issues when interacting with senior center members and clients.
  • Experience with telephone reception.
  • Comfort in using the computer to read daily schedules of classes and programs at the Senior Center
  • Prompt and organized
Training
A review of the procedures, how to use the postage machine, etc. will be provided. Excellent grammar skills essential.

Commitment
If you are comfortable with the task, we ask that you make a minimum commitment of three months. If you like working with seniors, we have a homey location and fun people to work with.

Volunteer Coordinator

Time required: 4 - 6 hours per week

Day/Time
Flexible, but regular schedule preferred, (such as being present the same days/time each week).

Duties
Coordinate volunteers for the Center including:

  • Arranging and processing an intake form for each volunteer.
  • Keeping a sign in log for volunteers to record their hours.
  • Seeing that each volunteer has a description of their duties.
  • Keeping a schedule/calendar of volunteer hours at the Center for staff and volunteers.
  • Checking in with volunteers to see if they have any needs to be able to do their job effectively.
  • Advising the Executive Director of any management issues that arise regarding specific volunteers.
  • Working with staff to provide volunteer recognition activities such as volunteer of the month article in the Wisdom Counts Newspaper, Volunteer stories on the website (with their approval) volunteer birthday and get well correspondence; annual volunteer holiday party.
Requirements
  • Experience managing people or volunteers.
  • Understanding senior issues when interacting with volunteers, members, and clients.
  • Friendly, encouraging, welcoming attitude.
  • Ability to use email, word perfect or similar word processing
  • Organized
Reports To: Executive Director

Training
A review of the procedures will be provided and regular meetings with the Executive Director.

Commitment
If you are comfortable with the task, we ask that you make a minimum commitment of six months. If you like working with seniors, we have a homey location and fun people to work with.

Gratitude Assistant/Administrative Assistant

Time required: 4 - 8 hours per week

Day/Time
Flexible, but regular schedule preferred, (such as being present the same days/time each week).

Duties
Prepare thank you letters or notes for all donations received each week. All letters will be signed by the Executive Director and then the volunteer asked to prepare the letters for mailing and postage.

Requirements

  • Use of Excel, word processing, and mail merge essentials
  • Excellent grammar skills.
  • Comfort in learning copying machine, postage meter, and e-filing system.
  • Ability to use email.
Reports To: Executive Director

Training
A review of the procedures, how to use the postage machine, etc. will be provided.

Commitment
If you are comfortable with the task, we ask that you make a minimum commitment of 3 months. If you like working with seniors, we have a homey location and fun people to work with.




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