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TOP STORIES

  • Senior Center seeks program volunteers Balance Class Assistant We have recently added a balance and fitness class to our program repertoire, and we are looking for an assistant to the facilitator. We are looking for ...
    Posted Mar 1, 2018, 11:35 AM by SASC Admin
  • Mature Women's Support Group 12-Week SeriesNext Series Begins April 5, 201811:30 a.m. - 1:15 p.m.
    Posted Mar 1, 2018, 11:31 AM by SASC Admin
  • Annual review shows growth, healthy future The Sebastopol Area Senior Center has published its annual report for fiscal year July 1, 2016, through June 30, 2017. Our financial standing is improving, we are offering more services ...
    Posted Mar 1, 2018, 9:57 AM by SASC Admin
  • SCHEDULE: Sebastopol Senior Walking Group March and April 2018Tuesdays and Thursdays, 9:30-10:30Mostly flat trails. Meet at parking lots at heads of trails.Wear sturdy shoes. Bring water.For more information ...
    Posted Feb 22, 2018, 10:23 AM by SASC Admin
  • What is our practice regarding medical emergencies? Being prepared for medical emergenciesWe take your health and safety very seriously at the Sebastopol Area Senior Center. In our effort to prepare ourselves for dealing with emergencies, we ...
    Posted Feb 13, 2018, 3:37 PM by SASC Admin
  • Nominee takes on KKK with tennis racket Ralene HearnRalene Hearn who took on the KKK with a tennis racket is one of the 2018 nominees under consideration to be enshrined on the Sebastopol Living Peace Wall ...
    Posted Feb 9, 2018, 11:33 AM by SASC Admin
  • Falling down leads to waking up How Falling Down Can Lead to Waking Up: Learning from Loss and Pain ~ By Shepherd Bliss Shepherd Bliss I have owned an organic farm for over two dozen years. It ...
    Posted Feb 8, 2018, 3:41 PM by SASC Admin
  • Senior Center to host Speaking of Death Third Fridays, 3:30 - 5:00 p.m.  Picture this: You’ve been invited to a dinner party. Friends and family sit around the table. The topic arises that a ...
    Posted Feb 15, 2018, 4:56 PM by SASC Admin
  • Facing challenges, addressing needs Linda Civitello Executive Director Starting the YearStarting as the Executive Director a year ago, I knew we had many challenges ahead but also the resources to face those challenges ...
    Posted Feb 5, 2018, 3:40 PM by SASC Admin
  • 2018 AARP Driver Safety Class Schedule
    Posted Dec 6, 2017, 1:28 PM by SASC Admin
  • Falls, leading cause of fatal, non-fatal injuries Falls are the leading cause of fatal and non-fatal injuries for older Americans, according to the National Council on Aging. Falls threaten seniors' safety and independence and generate enormous ...
    Posted Sep 26, 2017, 11:26 AM by SASC Admin
  • Seniors learn about affects, benefits of medical cannabis Seniors explore various forms of cannabis NOTE: The following essay is a distillation of author Laurel Dewey’s book “Betty’s (Little Basement) Garden.” During the nearly two years I ...
    Posted Nov 13, 2017, 11:00 AM by SASC Admin
  • LGBTQI seniors face extraordinary challenges Older population is growingAmerica's older population is growing, and so is the number of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, questioning, and intersex(LGBTQI) adults who are moving into their ...
    Posted Jul 31, 2017, 4:30 PM by SASC Admin
  • Senior Center to help earn income, make planned gift We are pleased to announce that we now can arrange for you to purchase a Charitable Gift Annuity! Charitable Gift Annuities A charitable gift annuity is a great way to ...
    Posted Aug 28, 2017, 11:17 AM by SASC Admin
  • Dine with seniors and guests Monday through Friday, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.Dine with seniors and guests at Sebastopol Senior Center Fresh meals, made daily, to order. Visit with local seniors and ...
    Posted Dec 29, 2016, 10:41 AM by SASC Admin
Showing posts 1 - 15 of 15. View more »

Senior Center seeks program volunteers

posted Mar 1, 2018, 11:35 AM by SASC Admin   [ updated Mar 1, 2018, 11:35 AM ]

Balance Class Assistant

We have recently added a balance and fitness class to our program repertoire, and we are looking for an assistant to the facilitator. We are looking for someone to assist with:

  • playing music
  • modeling seated poses & postures
  • class set up
  • other general duties
Special Event Volunteer(s)

Duties include table set up, decorating, registering, cleaning up after the event, etc.
  • Event: St. Patty’s Day Shamrock Dance, Saturday, March 17 (flexible times)
  • Event: Rumi’s Caravan, Sunday, March 25, from 2:15-5:00 p.m.
  • Event: LGBT Dance: Mostly Motown Beach Party, Saturday, April 28 (flexible times)
  • Event: Friday, April 13: Movie Night from 5:15 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
If you are interested in volunteering for any of these positions, please contact Katie Davis, Program Director, katie@sebastopolseniorcenter.org, or 707-829-2440.

Mature Women's Support Group

posted Mar 1, 2018, 11:31 AM by SASC Admin   [ updated Mar 1, 2018, 11:31 AM ]

12-Week Series
Next Series Begins April 5, 2018
11:30 a.m. - 1:15 p.m.

Annual review shows growth, healthy future

posted Feb 27, 2018, 1:50 PM by SASC Admin   [ updated Mar 1, 2018, 9:57 AM ]

The Sebastopol Area Senior Center has published its annual report for fiscal year July 1, 2016, through June 30, 2017. Our financial standing is improving, we are offering more services, and we have increased membership, according to our annual review.

In the last fiscal year, we had 490 members who received 5,000 units of service (a class/workshop/lunch/etc.). With only half of this fiscal year behind us, we now have 555 members and have had 5,100 units of service.

Thanks to all our members, donors, volunteers, and staff, we are moving ahead to keep this Senior Center relevant and sustainable for our community.

Soon, our Board of Directors will be engaging in a strategic planning project. We are eager to hear from you about what you would like offered at the Senior Center.  Watch for more information about this project.

Finally, as we make our plans for the next few years, we will definitely be including a celebration.  2019 will be our 50th Year Anniversary!  Stay tuned for news about our plans.

Financial Report

Fiscal Year 2016/17  
Income $478,966
Expenses $366,234
Net Operating Income $112,732
Assets (Leaseholder Improvements*) $660,873
Liabilities $11,421
Net Assets $649,452 
Financials show gain

The Sebastopol Area Senior Center has improved in the operating cash reserves over the last year. We can only keep up our gains with the continued support of our community.  We are EXTREMELY GRATEFUL to all who supported us in 2017.


*  The Sebastopol Area Senior Center does not own the building, but the Board raised the funds to remodel the building back in 2002. Therefore the leaseholder improvements are considered an asset. The actual cash to run the center is the Net Operating Income.

Revenue

Retail (Legacy & Holiday Stores)
$156,498 | 27%

Individual Donations, Memberships
$120,187 | 21%

Government Grants
$101,064 | 17%

Fundraising Events
$94,823 | 16%

Foundation Grants
$78,990 | 14%

Other (Fees Trips, Classes, Workshops)
$28,707 | 5%

Expenses

Programs & Services
$263,448 | 72%

Management
$72,105 | 20%

Fundraising
$30,681 | 8%

Services Provided

CLOSE TO 5000 SERVICE UNITS PROVIDED

Last year we provided close to 5,000 units of service here at the senior center to nearly 500 individuals. We provided 2,500 rides to 600 riders and through Council on Aging provided 10,500 meals to homebound seniors.

To accomplish this we had nearly 150 volunteers, providing rides, delivering meals, assisting at our Legacy Thrift Store and helping here at the senior center.

Specifically, we provided:

CLASSES / PROGRAMS

We offered 10 - 12 classes per week to an average of 100 participants. Classes included:

  • AARP Driver Safety: 4 times/year
  • AARP Refresher: 2 times / year
  • Birds Walks
  • Art Journaling
  • Balance
  • Chair Yoga
  • Feldenkrais
  • Pilates
  • Meditation
  • Qigong
  • Senior Walking Group
  • Spanish
  • SRJC Aging Gayfully
  • SRJC Life Stories Writing
  • Tai Chi
LUNCH

With the Council on Aging, an average of 175 – 200 participants per week came to the center for lunch and over 10,000 meals were delivered.

MEMORY LOSS PROGRAM

The Council on Aging provided the Senior Social Club for those with early memory loss to about 15 participants 3 times a week.

GAMES

About 50 seniors per week played games here:

  • Mahjong
  • Poker/Scrabble/Bridge
  • Table tennis
DISCUSSION & SUPPORT GROUPS

An average total of 45 seniors per week participated in:

  • Independent Writers’ group
  • In The News
  • Men’s Support Group
  • Women’s Support Group
INDIVIDUAL SERVICES

About 25 individuals per month received individual counseling or service:

  • Foot Care
  • HICAP (Assistance with signing up for CA health insurance)
  • Legal Aid
WORKSHOPS

The workshop topics were repeated 3 or 4 times per year. Attendance ranged from 5 – 50.

  • HICAP Medicare Fundamentals
  • Seniors and Cannabis
  • Senior Scam Workshops
  • Self-Acupressure (Jin Shin Do) Workshops

FIELD TRIPS

With an average attendance of 25, we offered seven field trips:

  • Grace Hudson Museum
  • Fort Ross for Russian Festival
  • Armstrong Redwoods hike & lunch
  • Whale Watching
  • Sausalito Bay Model tour & lunch at Spinnaker
  • San Francisco Ballet’s The Nutcracker
  • Cherish the Ladies at Green Music Center
JUST FOR FUN

Throughout the year we offered activities and events with attendance from 30 – 1,500:

  • Ice Cream Social
  • LGBTQI Dances 4 times/year with 50 in attendance
  • Spring Fling Luncheon & Entertainment (hosted by the Rotary)
  • St. Patrick’s Day Dance Pumpkin Carving Contest
  • Driven to Perfection Car Show
  • Aged To Perfection Dinner & Auction
  • Holiday Pot Luck
  • Volunteer Appreciation Luncheon
FACILITY USE

Many community organizations used our facilities this last year including:

  • Sober Sisters and kids
  • Gravenstein Gays
  • Stein Group
  • Appleseed Friends
  • Various Rotary committee meetings
  • Homeless Commission meeting
  • Birthday party rental
  • Masonic Church of Christ

SCHEDULE: Sebastopol Senior Walking Group

posted Feb 22, 2018, 9:58 AM by SASC Admin   [ updated Feb 22, 2018, 10:23 AM ]

March and April 2018
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 9:30-10:30
Mostly flat trails. Meet at parking lots at heads of trails.
Wear sturdy shoes. Bring water.
For more information call Walt Frazer (707) 407-5565

March 2018

March 1, Thursday:  Ross Station Road (2.5 mi.)
Go northwest on Hwy 116 toward Forestville. Turn left onto Ross Station Road. Drive about a half mile until you see bike trail sign. A small parking lot is just past this to the left. Okay to park beside the road. Coffee break in Forestville.

March 6, Tuesday: Joe Rodota Trail (3.6 mi.)
Park west side of HopMonk Tavern in City parking lot between Sebastopol Avenue and Hwy 116 South

March 8, Thursday: West County, Reverse (3.1 mi.)
East on Hwy 12 to Morris Street North (left) to Community Center parking lot.

March 13, Tuesday: Graton (3.4 mi.)
Go Northwest on Hwy 116 to Graton Road. Left (west) into town until just past Ross Road. Turn right into parking lot for bike trail west of old fire station.

March 15, Thursday: Laguna de Santa Rosa Trail
East on Hwy 12, just past Chevron station, turn north into the parking lot.

March 20, Tuesday: Santa Rosa Creek (2.4 mi)
East on Hwy 12 to Fulton Road. Left to stop light on Third Street. Right (E) to the second driveway on left (Senna) into the sports park. Park at the east end of lot past restrooms. If muddy, park at the west end.

March 22, Thursday: Ragle Park (2.7 mi.)
Take Hwy 12 west to Ragle Road. Park alongside the road near Covert Lane (or in the parking lot—pay ticket). Meet at SE corner of the parking lot in the park.

March 27, Tuesday: West County Trail (3.1 mi.)
Go North of Sebastopol on Hwy 116 to Mill Station Road. Turn into O'Reilly Media lot and park at the north-west end of parking lot.

March 29, Thursday: Ross Station Road
(See above for March 1)


April 2018

April 3, Tuesday: Santa Rosa Creek (2.4 mi)
East on Hwy 12 to Fulton Road. Left to stop light to Third Street Right (E) to the second drive on left into the sports park. Park at the east end of lot past restrooms. If muddy, park at the west end.

April 5, Thursday: Joe Rodota Trail (3.6 mi.)
Park west side of HopMonk Tavern in City parking lot between Sebastopol Avenue and Hwy 116 South.

April 10, Tuesday: West County, Reverse (3.1 mi.)
East on Hwy 12 to Morris Street North (left) to Community Center parking lot.

April 12, Thursday: Ross Station Road (2.5 mi.)
Go northwest on Hwy 116 toward Forestville. Turn left onto Ross Station Road. Drive about a half mile until you see bike trail sign. A small parking lot is just past this to the left. OK to park beside the road. Coffee break in Forestville.

April 17, Tuesday: Ragle Park (2.7 mi.)
Take Hwy 12 west to Ragle Road. Park alongside the road near Covert Lane (or
in the parking lot—pay ticket). Meet at southeast corner of the parking lot in the park.

April 19, Thursday: West County Trail (3.1 mi.)
Go north of Sebastopol on Hwy 116 to Mill Station Road. Turn into O'Reilly Media lot and park at the northwest end of parking lot.

April 24, Tuesday: Graton (3.4 mi.)
Go northwest on Hwy 116 to Graton Road. Left (west) into town until just
past Ross Road. Turn right into parking lot for bike trail west of old
fire station.

April 26, Thursday: Doran Beach (Bad weather, West County Trail)
Carpool from the Lucky parking lot. Bring snack/picnic to share.

What is our practice regarding medical emergencies?

posted Feb 13, 2018, 3:35 PM by SASC Admin   [ updated Feb 13, 2018, 3:37 PM ]

Being prepared for medical emergencies
We take your health and safety very seriously at the Sebastopol Area Senior Center. In our effort to prepare ourselves for dealing with emergencies, we have had staff trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Thanks to Mitch Savitsky, MD, we have a new defibrillator and training on how to use it.

Though being prepared as we can be, we also recognize that we are not qualified, medical professionals. In certain situations, we must call 911 and let the Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs) decide if the person needing assistance should go to a hospital emergency room (ER).

We will call 911
We will call 911 if a participant:

  • Slides out of their chair or falls and cannot get up on their own
  • Any bleeding, significant bruises, or bumps from an accident
  • Lightheadedness and/or change of color
  • Sudden extreme perspiration
  • Significant change in behavior or awareness
  • Has vomiting, extreme pain, or other signs of being unwell.
Sometimes persons with one or more of the above symptoms, insist that they are fine and do not want us to call 911. Please understand that are required to call 911 in these situations and let the professionals decide if it is necessary.

What happens if you are in a class/group/lunch and someone requires a 911 call?
The person requiring emergency assistance cannot be moved. If we can move folks in a class to another room, we will make way for the EMTs' arrival. If your class or group cannot be moved, we will try to make space around the ill person. We appreciate everyone’s cooperation in these instances and ask for your understanding that we cannot move the ill person from the room. We have to move everyone else for everyone’s safety.

Please feel free to stop by my office if you have any further questions. The health and safety of our participants are crucial.

~ By Linda Civitello, Executive Director

Nominee takes on KKK with tennis racket

posted Feb 9, 2018, 11:28 AM by SASC Admin   [ updated Feb 9, 2018, 11:33 AM ]

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Ralene Hearn

Ralene Hearn who took on the KKK with a tennis racket is one of the 2018 nominees under consideration to be enshrined on the Sebastopol Living Peace Wall.

Ralene Hearn was born in 1949, the oldest of five siblings, in a segregated neighborhood of Jackson, Mississippi. After Hurricane Camille destroyed their home in 1969, Ralene and her husband, whom she met on the high school debate team, relocated to New Orleans, Louisiana, where she became deeply involved in the Civil Rights movement and battled the Ku Klux Klan.

Growing up when segregation was a part of everyday life, Ralene knew from an early age that something just was not right. After the devastating impacts of Hurricane Camille, it became clear to her that something needed to be done after she witnessed discriminatory practices among federal hurricane relief efforts. She and her husband testified in a Congressional Hearing in defense of many black people who did not receive the same federal aid and disaster relief loans that white people received.

The situation arose in 1979 when one of her black students, Willie, told her he wanted to play tennis on the whites-only court, as the “colored person” court was unfenced and riddled with potholes. Yes, there remained many segregated communities after the Civil Rights Act of 1964, especially in the Deep South. Ralene grabbed some tennis rackets and marched with Willie to the whites-only court and played tennis when a large crowd began gathering, mostly KKK members. They had their guns drawn and threatened to kill Ralene. They even called her husband at work to tell them they were going to kill her. Ralene and Willie thankfully survived, and Ralene and her family were under federal protection for some time afterward.

After that incident, Ralene began writing her state representatives to take action against her neighborhood’s KKK group. Her hard work finally paid off as civil rights lawyers were sent to a “city council” meeting that was actually a KKK meeting. This eventually led to arrest of some Klan members and disbandment of the group.
Of the situation, Ralene writes, “That was one tennis match the town would never forget.” Her memories of the incident live on forever, commemorated in song: “The sugar cane plantations bear the sadness of a nation, the pain of segregation for too many years. We cried and cried together as we tried to make things better. Louisiana is soaked in our tears”.

A true believer in education, Ralene went on to receive her bachelor’s degree in Media, and her Master’s Degree in Speech Communications. Ralene also spent many years as a traveling musician, the only female in an all-male band, opening for bands like Creedence Clearwater Revival and Doobie Brothers. After a debilitating car accident and the passing of her beloved husband, she made Sebastopol her home. She frequents the Sebastopol Area Senior Center, attends many of the classes, and volunteers at the Senior Center playing music.

Thank you Ralene for all you did and all you continue to do to bring love to your community.

~ By Katie Davis and Richard Ruge

Falling down leads to waking up

posted Feb 8, 2018, 3:32 PM by SASC Admin   [ updated Feb 8, 2018, 3:41 PM ]

How Falling Down Can Lead to Waking Up: Learning from Loss and Pain

~ By Shepherd Bliss


Shepherd Bliss

I have owned an organic farm for over two dozen years. It has been my home as well as my work, identity, and love. Then, I fell into a grass-covered badger hole on Jan. 15 this year. I crawled painfully uphill to the house feeling like a baby. This unwelcome anniversary will remain in my now 73-year-old body and memory.

The fall plunged me into deep reflections and life-changing behavior. “You must change your life” is a poetry line that kept emerging as I spent hours each day in bed, no longer able to provide the farmer’s shadow with daily walks on the land so essential to good farming.

Growing up is not always easy even for elders. I’m closer to my death date than my birth date. Maturing can be sparked by a sudden, unexpected incident like falling. What to do other than feel sorry for one’s self? How can one turn a loss into a learning experience for oneself and others?

I began to lighten my load. I decided to give away hundreds of books, DVDs, records, furniture, luggage, dog things, etc., which I had been collecting for decades.

“I call that essentializing,” according to Alexandra Hart of Transition Sebastopol’s monthly Elders Salon, which has been meeting since 2010. “Aging makes one slower, so it means simplifying and letting go of stuff.”

“We’ve noticed in the Elders Salon that loss almost inevitably brings some kind of gain in its wake,” Hart said.

The smiles of friends and strangers as they load books and other things taking them on a journey into their lives delight me. I’m even asked to autograph some of the 24 books to which I have contributed reminding me that I can at least still write.

The fall became a blessing in disguise. Friends brought me chicken soup and other food, and helped lessen my isolation. I listened to their stories of having fallen, being sick, and experiencing excruciating pain. I appreciate living in small town Sebastopol with its caring community even more.“Loss can be conceptualized along three intersecting axes: loss of control, loss of identity, and loss of relationships,” Dr. Barbara Sourkes writes in her book The Deepening Shade: Psychological Aspects of Life-Threatening Illness.

My identity as a farmer is important. I farm most days of the year. After the fall, I have been unable to farm for weeks. Among my losses have been many basic body functions and control. I have also changed my self-image and body-image. Being more dependent on others is a stretch.

“When I’m physically drained, I often don’t feel like talking,” a client told Dr. Sourkes. I sometimes feel the same. Some friends have worn me down by their needs to talk, talk, talk. “I’m all talked out,” I say at times, which can make me feel like the bad guy.

I have been sharing my fears with friends some of whom report their own stories. “You strike a familiar chord of vulnerability that we all face,” Body-Worker Jeff Rooney said. “I work with many people for whom a big theme is falling and fear of falling. Falling is often a step away toward dying.”

Humans are so fragile, my brother Steve Bliss reminded me of our two-footed species. I am actually now three-footed since I walk with a cane, but that will eventually change. “Tomorrow’s a new day,” my brother reminded me as Ralph Waldo Emerson wrote.

This learning experience evolves. So where do I go from here? I’m not sure. I feel suspended between the no-longer and the not-yet.

As the elder Doug von Koss recently quoted a Sufi saying, “We have three days to live and two of them are gone.”

~ By Dr. Shepherd Bliss {3sb@comcast.net} is a retired college teacher, farmer, and writer.

Senior Center to host Speaking of Death

posted Jan 9, 2018, 10:45 AM by SASC Admin   [ updated Feb 15, 2018, 4:56 PM ]

Third Fridays, 3:30 - 5:00 p.m. 

Picture this: You’ve been invited to a dinner party. Friends and family sit around the table. The topic arises that a mutual friend has been diagnosed with advanced cancer. Where does the conversation go from there? It might orient to: “What kind of cancer does he/she have?” “What kinds of treatment are they getting?” Most likely it will end with, “It’s sad.”

Death Cafe was started in 2010 in London by John Underwood and his mother, Sue Barsky Ried, based on the ideas of Bernard Crettaz. The objective was to create a respectful environment for people to talk about death over tea and snacks. In an informal setting, we share our experiences and our questions. It’s not a venue for converting others in our beliefs about death and dying but a place to hear many perspectives and to honor our stories. Since its origination, Death Cafe’s have spread to over 51 countries and 5400 cafes. Death Café is considered a social franchise.

Speaking of Death will be facilitated by Tess Lorraine, who has been facilitating Death Café Sonoma in Santa Rosa monthly since 2014.

"Increasingly as we age, conversations will happen regarding degenerative and life-threatening diagnoses,” Lorraine said. “The choices we make will have implications about our own quality of life as well as for those who are close to us.

“The cost of denial is that we lose the opportunities for the wisdom, growth, and healing that can occur when we share authentically,” Lorraine said. “Our death is ultimately our final frontier and our lasting legacy."

Wisdom Counts Members, FREE: Non-Members: $5 Day Use Fee. Donations are accepted. Please bring a snack to share.

Facing challenges, addressing needs

posted Jan 8, 2018, 3:18 PM by SASC Admin   [ updated Feb 5, 2018, 3:40 PM ]

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Linda Civitello
Executive Director 

Starting the Year
Starting as the Executive Director a year ago, I knew we had many challenges ahead but also the resources to face those challenges. Thanks to the collective effort of so many, we are on the way to making the Sebastopol Area Senior Center sustainable.

This has been an incredible year for us, especially with the tragedies in the North Bay. I am simply awed by the outpouring of time, talent, and treasure both for our community and our Senior Center.

Volunteer Appreciation
In October, we celebrated the many donated talents by honoring our volunteers with a reception at Heron Hall. Legacy Manager Nick Vannucci coordinated a beautiful spread for nearly 100 volunteers. The volunteers who run The Legacy and Holiday stores, those who deliver meals or give rides, Board members, fundraisers, and those who volunteer at the Senior Center work together to make this place possible.

Day Trips
Besides making this place financially solvent, there are many issues that we have strived to address this year. Our elders wanted to have the opportunity to get out and about, especially since so many cannot drive. In response, we significantly increased the day trips we offer. Since October, we have hosted seven-day trips from the Fort Ross Festival to whale watching, to the Nutcracker Ballet in San Francisco all thanks to Katie Davis, our new program director.

Providing Rides for Homebound Seniors
Our transportation program continues to provide rides for our dedicated volunteer drivers. Dean Brittingham, the transportation coordinator, goes above and beyond in responding to requests. With incredible sensitivity, Dean listens as many who live in isolation and can no longer drive request a ride to their doctor, grocery shopping, or prescription filling. In 2017, she has arranged over 2,500 rides for 600 individuals.

Supporting LGBTQI Elders
Responding to the needs of isolated LGBTQI individuals, we initiated our LGBTQI Elder Resource Center, managed by Communications Director Wayne Wieseler. Along with hosting sensitivity training, providing meeting space for LGBTQI groups and hosting LGBTQI dances, we’ve offered Aging Gayfully, taught by Gary “Buz” Hermes here at the Senior Center.

Preventing Falls
Another issue we are working on is fall prevention. Since Sonoma County has a higher rate of falls than most of California, we recognized the need to address this public health challenge. In response, we are launching a new program, Stay Active and Independent for Life (SAIL), an evidence-based fall prevention program focusing on fitness. It is being taught by one of our renowned instructors, Julie Smith, physical therapist, and is under the direction of a Community Advisory Committee whose goal is to develop a coordinated response from emergency personnel, medical professionals, and eldercare providers to reduce the risks of fall injuries in the Sebastopol and West County area.

Reducing Health Risks, A Fresh Look
To reduce health risks right here at our Senior Center we replaced our old lumpy hazardous carpeting with beautiful laminate flooring and refurbished the dining and game rooms. All labor and materials were donated Thanks to DSB+ Flooring, Local 16 of the Floor Covering Union, the Sunrise and Sebastopol Rotaries, and Sebastopol Hardware. Their efforts look beautiful and our Senior Center is safer and cleaner for our seniors.

Addressing Critical Issues

Other critical issues we have addressed include – instruction on using one’s cell phone, fraud prevention, dealing with clutter, medical cannabis, driver safety, and so much more. Responding to the needs of individuals who require private sessions, we have been able to offer individual counseling on legal matters, health care insurance, case management, and personal services such as foot care. This year we will provide many new programs addressing significant issues for our community such as: Aging in Place at Home, Preparing to Take Care of a Parent, Housing Options for Seniors, and Managing the Challenges of Dementia.

And, Having Fun
And, we have fun while doing these activities– lots of music, good food, games, support groups, and especially great camaraderie. This is the place to be!

The Sebastopol Area Senior Center is an incredible resource to our community. I am honored to direct this organization, to work with a fantastic board, staff, and volunteers, and am humbled by the support provided by this community.

Together in 2018, we will continue to develop this organization and our ever-increasing relevance to the growing elder community.

2018 AARP Driver Safety Class Schedule

posted Dec 6, 2017, 1:26 PM by SASC Admin   [ updated Dec 6, 2017, 1:28 PM ]


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